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Kresser Podcast, Low Carb And Mucus Problems.


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#1
Noogis

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So I was listening to this Chris Kresser podcast from last November ( http://chriskresser....with-jeff-leach ) and they were talking about how if you don't get enough carbohydrates, or starve your micro biome of the fiber that it needs they can start eating the mucus in your gut causing all sorts of problems, including leaky gut.

This seems to be a similar thing that Dave talks about. He went very low carb and ended up with problems creating mucus for gut lining. I believe it ended up causing a little bit of leaky gut and even caused him to have an egg allergy.

#2
Jason Miller

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yes, hence the cyclical low carb part of the diet.


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#3
Noogis

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yes, hence the cyclical low carb part of the diet.


Definitely. I thought it was interesting, and liked how it backed up one of main ideas behind BP diet.

#4
drumminangoleiro

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thanks for the link, that was a pretty interesting podcast. i only listened to the 2nd half because i was mostly interested in the parts about how diet effects the gut biome.

 

i found it weird that Jeff Leach suggested that ideally you should have 3 bowel movements a day. for me its usually just one, depending on how the mct in my BPC wants to treat me that day. i also found it weird that they seemed to imply that if you have a healthy gut biome you should be burping and farting... i thought that was one of the good things about the BP diet - pretty much no gas at all. also interesting that the 3 top foods that Jeff Leach would bring with him to a desert island are garlic, onions, and leeks! makes me wonder if we are missing out on some really important stuff if we eliminate those foods. i wonder what some other more BP sources of prebiotic fiberr would be. ive been getting back into quest bars lately, they have a bunch of prebiotic fiber, i wonder if they did this intentionally knowing that a lot of their customers are low carbers? this podcast is also a good reminder that maybe its time i start trying to get more resistant starch. but i dunno...i'm kind of enjoying not farting. 

 

i might have to sign up for this american gut thing. its been mentioned here before but i always wondered how useful the information would actually be for me vs. just contributing to the research (yeah i know, selfish!). anyone actually found some personalized info from this that helped them dial in their gut biome? 



#5
Noogis

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Drummin,
Agreed on all accounts. I had cut out garlic and onions for a period of time when I went bulletproof. The main reason was the claim of brain fog. I didn't really notice any brain fog when I reintroduced these foods into my diet.

I found this to be one of the most interesting podcasts I had listened to lately. The three of movements per day along with the burping and farting claims also seemed a little strange to me.

Something that was striking to me was how he kept reiterating that we really don't know the half of it when it comes to gut health.

I hope to sign up for the American gut program as well. Hopefully I can set aside some funds toward the end of this year, that definitely seems like something very important. similar to blood panels.

#6
Nickat

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Wait.....does that mean L-glutamine supps only feed the micro biome if it`s bad already?

 

That the carb refeeds or higher carb ratio will stop the micro biome eating the much needed mucus but only through delaying it?

 

Histamine intolerance (if you have it) and anti-inflammation diets in general only delay (if you avoid or do them) but don`t  fix the problem either?

 

"A histamine overload leads to increased inflammation and many other symptoms including: skin irritation, hives, throat tightening, increased heart rate, nasal congestion, migraines, fatigue, heartburn, reflux, and weight gain. Unlike other food allergies and sensitivities, the response from histamine intolerance is cumulative and not always immediate, so it is harder to pin point right away".

 

Lastly re-populating the gut biome with something is better than nothing as long as it IS good bacteria but might take a very long time to balance it if at all?

 

Sorry all questions, any thoughts?



#7
Dead Can Dance

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Chris recommends you eat resistant starch, something like this;

http://www.amazon.co...s=potato starch

 

You can read it here;

http://chriskresser....with-jeff-leach

 

I've done the hard work, it's below;

So, what I’ve been trying to do in those situations is get people who are doing a ketogenic or very low carb diet on some prebiotics and some resistant starch in the form of potato starch, which doesn’t seem to have any negative impact on their blood sugar and, in fact, actually has the opposite effect in many cases.  Richard Nikoley over at Free the Animal has been writing a lot about resistant starch, and a lot of people with blood sugar issues have seen drops of, like, 10 or 15 mg/dL of their fasting blood sugar just from taking 4 tablespoons a day of potato starch, which has, as you know, a lot of resistant starch in it.  And in my patients, I’ve seen a similar response and also with people with long-term constipation and gut issues.  Of course, it makes sense that resistant starch could play a significant role there.  So, I would say at least tentatively now that if anyone is on a ketogenic or very low carb diet, that you might consider some prebiotic fibers or resistant starch just to make sure that you’re feeding your gut bugs what they need to survive.



#8
Nickat

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Nice info man but not sure it answered the questions asked above.....well sort of.

 

Have you looked at Richard Nikoley and his milk and kefir diet N=1 for a month.

The loads of potato flour he`s taken to show effects on his blood glucose.

It`s all good stuff and an easy read.

He goes on about using plantain flour and gives links to recipes such as:

 

Plantain Pancakes

  2 cups plantain flour
  3 tsp baking powder
  ½ tsp sea salt
  3 tablespoons cane juice crystal 
  3 tablespoons cooking oil
  1 cup milk
  
Mix ingredients thoroughly and spoon onto hot griddle.

 

All can be found here:

https://www.bulletpr...sistant-starch/

and here:

http://www.barryfarm...antainflour.htm

lastly:

http://freetheanimal...probiotics.html

 

The trouble with it is that it`s flour....now correct me if wrong but is n`t it supposed to be starch....resistant starch.......hmmm.....maybe banana and plantain flours are resistant starches but then why all the fuss about not confusing the potato starch with potato flour. Is it because the resistant potato starch is raw?



#9
Noogis

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Picked up a bag of bobs potato starch, I'll try it out this weekend

#10
Nickat

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So are you going to do this in an enema to bypass the small intestine?

 

 

 

Picked up a bag of bobs potato starch, I'll try it out this weekend



#11
Noogis

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I thought the point of resistant starch was that you didn't need to stick a potato up your butt.

#12
Nickat

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Personally think 4g a day in a shake would work equally as well Noogis.



#13
Andy Boskamp

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I thought the point of resistant starch was that you didn't need to stick a potato up your butt.

 

Yes that is correct. It is indigestible in the stomach and makes it to the small intestine intact. You wouldn't want it to bypass the small intestine, that is where it must be to feed beneficial microbes.

 

The only reason Dave has mentioned trying resistant starch in his butt is because he was having a histamine reaction when taking potato starch orally.



#14
Roxas

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thanks for the link, that was a pretty interesting podcast. i only listened to the 2nd half because i was mostly interested in the parts about how diet effects the gut biome.

 

i found it weird that Jeff Leach suggested that ideally you should have 3 bowel movements a day. for me its usually just one, depending on how the mct in my BPC wants to treat me that day. i also found it weird that they seemed to imply that if you have a healthy gut biome you should be burping and farting... i thought that was one of the good things about the BP diet - pretty much no gas at all. also interesting that the 3 top foods that Jeff Leach would bring with him to a desert island are garlic, onions, and leeks! makes me wonder if we are missing out on some really important stuff if we eliminate those foods. i wonder what some other more BP sources of prebiotic fiberr would be. ive been getting back into quest bars lately, they have a bunch of prebiotic fiber, i wonder if they did this intentionally knowing that a lot of their customers are low carbers? this podcast is also a good reminder that maybe its time i start trying to get more resistant starch. but i dunno...i'm kind of enjoying not farting. 

 

i might have to sign up for this american gut thing. its been mentioned here before but i always wondered how useful the information would actually be for me vs. just contributing to the research (yeah i know, selfish!). anyone actually found some personalized info from this that helped them dial in their gut biome? 











The main thing we are missing out on in terms of garlic and onions is mega doses of FODMAPs.


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#15
John Brisson

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I have said this before and I will say it again extremely low carb or no carb should be used in only specific medical situations (seizures) and for very short period of time. http://perfecthealth...o-carb-dangers/


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#16
Stevo

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Isn't it possible for the body to create glucose out of body fat? Triacylglyerol? Or protein? If something as important as mucus is involved, wouldn't the body have a mechanism to allow for that?

 

(not arguing, just asking)


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#17
John Brisson

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Isn't it possible for the body to create glucose out of body fat? Triacylglyerol? Or protein? If something as important as mucus is involved, wouldn't the body have a mechanism to allow for that?

 

(not arguing, just asking)

 

Here is a crappy analogy but I'm using it.

 

Apes can synthesize ascorbic acid. Humans cannot synthesize ascorbic acid. Humans need ascorbic acid to live, yet we lost the genetic capability to produce it. Why did we lose the mechanism to develop ascorbic acid?

 

Granted humans use uric acid instead of ascorbic acid as one of the main antioxidants and as part of metabolism, but still WTH human body?

 

So does the human body have mechanisms within itself to handle all situations and diets? The short answer is no. Mucus is a glycoprotein that should require glucose / glycogen and protein to be properly synthesized in the body. Therefore a permanent zero carb diet would prevent if from being developed properly.

 

Then again if you take this blog post seriously I'm full of it: http://mostlymeatisw...deficiency.html. This writer states that glycine and proline that are rarer in a ketogenic diet are the main part of the problem of the drying out of mucus membranes. But even so, the mucus might be "wetter" but there still wouldn't be enough to go around.

 

So you can either eat gelatin and hope for the best, or take no less then 30 grams of carbs a day, and get your refeeds in.


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#18
Infinusss

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Here is a crappy analogy but I'm using it.

Apes can synthesize ascorbic acid. Humans cannot synthesize ascorbic acid. Humans need ascorbic acid to live, yet we lost the genetic capability to produce it. Why did we lose the mechanism to develop ascorbic acid?

Granted humans use uric acid instead of ascorbic acid as one of the main antioxidants and as part of metabolism, but still WTH human body?

So does the human body have mechanisms within itself to handle all situations and diets? The short answer is no. Mucus is a glycoprotein that should require glucose / glycogen and protein to be properly synthesized in the body. Therefore a permanent zero carb diet would prevent if from being developed properly.

Then again if you take this blog post seriously I'm full of it: http://mostlymeatisw...deficiency.html. This writer states that glycine and proline that are rarer in a ketogenic diet are the main part of the problem of the drying out of mucus membranes. But even so, the mucus might be "wetter" but there still wouldn't be enough to go around.

So you can either eat gelatin and hope for the best, or take no less then 30 grams of carbs a day, and get your refeeds in.


Can we get our minimal carbs from non-starchy carbs from green veggies?

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#19
Garrett_K

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Can't a person get ample enough fibre from veggies? Are refeeds absolutely necessary?



#20
ACH85

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Can't a person get ample enough fibre from veggies? Are refeeds absolutely necessary?

---

Ample fiber from veggies, yes. But we need digestible carbohydrate for a variety of bodily functions. Fiber ≠ carb, in fact we generally subtract fiber grams from our total grams carbohydrate to arrive at "net carbs." 







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