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Grassfed Butter Brands

butter grass-fed cows

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#1
TimeStreamer

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I was searching for a grass fed butter source other than Kerrygold because I would prefer to buy American. As any person should prefer to purchase products from their home country. I found a place called Humboldt Creamery that says they used pastured grass fed cows but when I e-mailed them asking if this was 100% grass fed with no grain whatsoever they said that there are times in the year when the pastures are not fertile enough to provide the grass and they must be grain fed - so no they are not 100% grass fed.

Is this possible that this could be the case at Kerrygold as well? Does anyone know about this? Are there any other grass fed butters produced in the US?

#2
suntoucher

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If it's something like a few weeks of grain supplementation per year, that's fine imo. Don't overthink this.
Check out my Bulletproof: Notes & Cheat Sheet, Extensive Supplements Guide.

#3
TimeStreamer

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A few weeks at Kerrygold or a few weeks at Humboldt Creamery?

#4
Reis

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I support good people, good products, and good businesses world-wide, including those in the US, but many from other countries. KerryGold is an excellent product that I support, as are any of the variations of Indian ghee you can use in BP coffee. Absolutely check local farms for the convenience, but infusing nationalism into the purchase of butter (and telling people they should do the same) is a bit much.

#5
Sunny66

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Kerry Gold butter is made from milk of cows that are grassfed for 'only' up to 312 days out of the year. However, during the winter months they are also fed barley and wheat. I only found one dairybrand so far that produces butter from cows that are grassfed year round, but this brand is not American, either: German Butter (unsalted) by Fond 'O Foods. I haven't found out where to order it online, yet. I got lucky at my local Bon Appetit store, but - quite frankly - it is very expensive to buy there. I will be looking for a new, less expensive source.

#6
Reis

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Kerry Gold butter is made from milk of cows that are grassfed for 'only' up to 312 days out of the year. However, during the winter months they are also fed barley and wheat. I only found one dairybrand so far that produces butter from cows that are grassfed year round, but this brand is not American, either: German Butter (unsalted) by Fond 'O Foods. I haven't found out where to order it online, yet. I got lucky at my local Bon Appetit store, but - quite frankly - it is very expensive to buy there. I will be looking for a new, less expensive source.


That is sad if Kerry Gold hides that information. They even duped Dave Asprey, as he recommends this butter for BP coffee.

You can order Fond O Foods butter here, but you're right, it's pricey as hell. 50% more expensive than Kerry Gold via Trader Joe's...yikes! Looks like I'll have to hope when I buy Kerrygold it's from the good time of year batch...

#7
Sunny66

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Kerry Gold actually provides this information on their website :-)
A friend of mine alerted me to it...I was VERY surprised about this information, as I had never heard/ read about it before, either.

#8
Sunny66

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Reis, thanks so much for the link! I paid $5.99 for it at Bon Appetit, so this price - though still expensive- is still a lot better!!!

#9
ghostrunner

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First post!

At one of the Whole Foods in Colorado Springs, there is a brand called "Kalona Super Natural" Organic Unsalted Butter. The packaging also says Grass Fed, Small Batches, No added Hormones, Gluten Free.
I forgot what I paid, but it was the only one that had the label "grass fed" on the packaging. I havent tried it yet, as I'm waiting for my mold free coffee beans.

In additon they have a statement on one of the sides of the box that says: "Chances are you've never tasted butter that is this fresh and delicious.That's because we believe in doing less - not more - when it comes to our organic butter. We start with grass fed cream from small family farms and create small batches of butter using a hands-on method that is rare today. This attention to detail and our supremely simple process produce a distinctively delicious organic butter. Kalona Supernatural ™ is based in Kalona, Iowa, a small community in the heartland of America. We use local, grass fed organic milk from small, sustainable family farms with average herds of 50 cows on less than 180 acres."

Here's a pic (its the pink/red one): http://growingupnatural.com/?p=20492

#10
Reis

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First post!

At one of the Whole Foods in Colorado Springs, there is a brand called "Kalona Super Natural" Organic Unsalted Butter. The packaging also says Grass Fed, Small Batches, No added Hormones, Gluten Free.
I forgot what I paid, but it was the only one that had the label "grass fed" on the packaging. I havent tried it yet, as I'm waiting for my mold free coffee beans.


Ghostrunner this is such a great tip! I used the brand's store finder and I can get this butter three blocks away. Of course I just bought two bricks of Kerry Gold at Trader Joe's before checking the forum, but at least I have options now. I'm curious how truly compromised our BP coffee experience has been using Kerry Gold...good to know there's other options...

#11
TimeStreamer

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I am sure Dave knows about Kerrygold not feeding their cows 100% grass. I e-mailed Kalona asking the same thing about their cows. I have a feeling they won't say they are on a 100% grass fed diet. It makes sense that all farms can't feed their cattle 100% grass because there are times in the year that pastures can not provide enough for them. Especially in the cold winters of Iowa.

#12
Reis

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I am sure Dave knows about Kerrygold not feeding their cows 100% grass. I e-mailed Kalona asking the same thing about their cows. I have a feeling they won't say they are on a 100% grass fed diet. It makes sense that all farms can't feed their cattle 100% grass because there are times in the year that pastures can not provide enough for them. Especially in the cold winters of Iowa.


Has this been addressed with Dave on the forum or one of the podcasts? I'm curious how compromised the CLA content is for butter from barley/grain-fed cows. I would assume (mind you I know NOTHING about how this stuff works) that cows who are grass fed most of the year would yield better butter (yes that happened) on a partial diet of grains, vs factory-farmed corn-fed cattle. But is there a way to quantify the difference?

#13
TimeStreamer

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This might answer your question:
http://www.bulletpro...ed-meat-part-1/

This just addresses the meat quality though, not the milk.

#14
jond

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At my local Whole Foods, they have pastured butter in the dairy refrigerator for about $5-7 for a 8 oz package!

However, they have Kerrygold in the cheese section for $2.99!

#15
Reis

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This might answer your question:
http://www.bulletpro...ed-meat-part-1/

This just addresses the meat quality though, not the milk.


It's hard to imagine (if the CLA degradation is severe in the meat after a couple of months) that the butter would not suffer the same fate. This would mean that the BP coffee is only optimal when cattle actually feed on grass. If BP coffee is highly-dependent on the sky-high levels of CLA in the butter, and in winter time we're taking in dramatically less CLA per serving, then we need to figure out a way to compensate for the CLA deficiency. What's worse is we would have to gauge the time lag created by the dairy's production schedule. Maybe (for example) Kerry Gold produces enough butter from actual grass-fed cows to keep up with the supply until (hypothetically) November. We would need a way to find that out...a production date stamp would be ideal in this case.

Sorry if this is getting way too micro, but it seems like a pretty big black hole in the effectiveness of BP coffee. Am I wrong?

#16
TimeStreamer

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Here is my response from Kalona:

Thanks for writing, Mark!

Our butter comes from cows that are primarily grass fed but at certain times they do get a 20% portion of organic grains.
Here is something that I have sent to people explaining the feeding of our cows.
Hope is will be interesting to you. Just my opinion at this point.

Pam at Kalona

Our milk is not 100% grassfed. The cows are in the pasture and 100% grass fed part of the year and at other key times they get a 20% supplement of organic grains.
Seems to me that the claims of 100% grass fed proponents may be a bit exaggerated...the part where they claim that a cow must get absolutely NO grain in order for them to make the CLA and other good things in the milk or meat.
In nature the cows would find an occasional ear of corn or some wheat on the end of the grass stalk that they obviously enjoy eating. I have personally come to that conclusion after our milk was tested by a dairy publication in an independent study and our milk came out with quite high CLA content, the second highest of all the dairies tested in the whole Midwest! So, I think cows eating a mostly grass diet with a bit of organic grain produces good healthy milk. Seems like a logical, balanced way of doing it. Our farmers are following the traditional way of raising and handling dairy cows that worked very well for a long time.



#17
Reis

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In nature the cows would find an occasional ear of corn or some wheat on the end of the grass stalk that they obviously enjoy eating. I have personally come to that conclusion after our milk was tested by a dairy publication in an independent study and our milk came out with quite high CLA content, the second highest of all the dairies tested in the whole Midwest! So, I think cows eating a mostly grass diet with a bit of organic grain produces good healthy milk. Seems like a logical, balanced way of doing it. Our farmers are following the traditional way of raising and handling dairy cows that worked very well for a long time.


Thanks for the update. The troubling part of this is that they are addressing only *occasional* grain & corn exposure. When the true concern is what happens to CLA content after months of consecutive grain feeding. It's a leap to think that 20% grain exposure equals a simple 20% reduction in CLA content.

#18
ghostrunner

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Reis, nice work on the follow up research with Kalona.
Maybe the label should say "100% grassfed 80% of the time". :-P
Heh...oh well, I think I'll finish off the Kalona, and then maybe continue the quest for something that might be a little better.

#19
Reis

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Reis, nice work on the follow up research with Kalona.
Maybe the label should say "100% grassfed 80% of the time". :-P
Heh...oh well, I think I'll finish off the Kalona, and then maybe continue the quest for something that might be a little better.


You have Mark to thank for the reply from Kalona.

The essence of my issue is that, where do we go for that "something that might be a little better"? I think the GF butter situation is shaping up to just be what it is, and we should know that if CLA content is as important to the BP experience as Dave represents, we should be prepared for varying results depending on when the butter we eat has higher CLA content. It kinda is what it is I guess...

#20
MichelleAwsm

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I can't consistently get good butter where I'm at, so I stockpile Purity Farms ghee! Organic, grass, fed, and shelf stable. I keep a jar in my car! In a pinch at least I have ghee and tea on the road.





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