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Best Times To Drink Coffee, According To Science!


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#1
drumminangoleiro

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i thought this was interesting: http://en.ilovecoffe.../posts/view/110

 

although i kind of wonder about the idea of our biological clock following our external clocks. everyone's got a different sleeping schedule, does their cortisol level follow the rhythm set by their daily routine or the external clock (which has a slight relationship to daylight but not exactly with daylight savings and all of that stuff)?



#2
Reka

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This says we should be experiencing a natural jolt between 8-9 am? And then feel more down between 9:30-11:30.

My answer: I could be a morning person, if morning started at noon.

:-P


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#3
Della Marie

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6:30 am is my jolt of energy. It is my curse more like it. Doesn't matter what timezone I go to within one day my body know 6:30 and I'm wide awake. I don't even want or need a bulletproof coffee until 10ish.

#4
Marielle

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Della Marie,
I am definitely a lark and may have you beat for early morning cortisol rushes. My body likes to wake up about 4:30 am. I just got back to the west coast last weekend after being in Miami/Caribbean for over a week. I'm completely back on schedule. I drink my coffee early -- about 6 am. I like my coffee anytime, though.

Mary


#5
bestcoast85

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Essentially what the article (or blog post) boils down to is coffee is more effective when you are feeling sluggish. Cutting out this meta biochemistry (i.e. you are more energized when cortisol is up and cortisol levels are tied to circadian rythms), this rationale is completely intuitive; the marginal effect of something that energizes you ought to be greater at a low baseline, just as the marginal value of money to a homeless person is greater than that for a millionaire, just as vitamin C is super helpful when there is a huge deficiency (scurvy) and lesser as you approach the healthy range. The times mentioned are certainly erroneous since every person's circadian are unique.

 

Very simply, try drinking coffee when you feel most sluggish throughout the day. Pretty intuitive, no? Don't over complicate things.







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